Posts Tagged ‘compromise agreement’

Directors get booted

Staff are performance managed when they’re not quite fitting in – ever hopeful of significant improvement. On the other hand, directors just get booted.

Over the last 17 years of headhunting, I have received many calls from directors who have been booted by their employers.

Often, newly booted directors will talk about the fact that they wish to find something new, but there’s no rush. This usually means that they are working their notice either at home or have arranged a ‘compromise deal’, or ‘settlement agreement’. The same scenario by different names.

A settlement agreement is essentially a sum of money to shut you up and not make a claim against the company for unfair dismissal since you are likely to be leaving the same day they decide your face no longer fits with the organisation.

When your face doesn’t fit anymore, take the money and move on. Negotiate the best deal based upon the likelihood of finding something within a reasonable timescale within your discipline. Compromise deals vary depending upon the length of service and other factors.

There is little point dressing it up as something else because everyone knows everyone and an HR reference doesn’t go far when senior bods speak to each other.

When you face this shocking event, it is essential to take some time-out to reflect, before rushing into the next job.

If the timing works and there is a job just around the corner for you, great – go for it.

Think long and hard about the culture of the business you have just left and whether you’d like to repeat the same. It’s easy to think that the speed of returning to any job is important, often a decision made in haste will be regretted later.

Your value hasn’t changed. You are still the same person you were last week or last month or last year. What has changed is the company’s view on whether you fit their organisation anymore? The business might be out-growing you.

Sometimes it’s better to be out of a business that doesn’t value your contribution and join a business that would embrace your experiences with open arms.

Try to be realistic about your situation. It’s much better to say I’ve been booted out because they had other ideas and we were not aligned in our thinking than to say you’ve resigned suddenly and working notice from your garden. It might be that you have resigned and have been forced to work from home, as part of a confidentiality issue, but honesty is the best policy when speaking to a new employer.

Companies make changes all of the time at Director level and it’s not a big deal. You won’t be the only Director on the planet who’s taken a whack of cash and considered your new options. Few directors leave a business, many fall out of favour.

When it happens to you, there’s an automatic feeling of failure. Most of the changes are personality clashes, not performance issues. Sometimes a combination of both, but that being the case, why do so many get back to work relatively quickly afterwards? 

I hope this insight has been helpful and that you remember my observations.

Feeling Snookered in your career?

SnookerAs I sat watching Ronnie O’Sullivan achieve success over the weekend, it occurred to me that careers can also take a similar turn of either bad luck, skill, good fortune or a combination of all. Sometimes, it’s pot after pot, nice and easy – other times, it’s oh no, I’m snookered and I can’t see a way through. When you’re employed, you see the world from a different perspective than if you’re self-employed. What are you thinking about on Sunday around 3 or 4pm? Are you thinking about returning to work? Does it fill you with dread, or are you getting excited about the challenges you’ll face, making to-do lists for the next day? Are you popular at work? Do you actually know? How close are you to work colleagues? How many would you invite to your wedding? How many would you take time to visit if they had a spell in hospital? How many would visit you?

Skills Shortage Hits Housebuilding.

BlackFridayIt’s no surprise that the Housebuilding sector is beginning to show cracks, where the availability of talented individuals is concerned. It wasn’t so long ago that 10,000 people were made redundant. Not 10,000 subcontractors, I’m referring to employed staff located within offices of housebuilding groups up and down the country. Some would argue that many of the casualties were sub-standard folk and no real loss. That being the case, why is so difficult to find the best people in the housebuilding industry today?

Sick of Recruiters?

FacefitFishingThere’s something happening in the workplace, which is frustrating the life out of personnel within the housebuilding industry. I can’t speak of other industries, but I would imagine it’s a similar picture. Just recently, I’ve been speaking with several ‘unknowns’. To classify an ‘unknown’ is someone that I tap on the shoulder, having never spoken before and introduce myself in a professional way. Usually, the approach is made either via email and phone or some other means, Linkedin, Facebook etc. I have a job on my hands, literally, in having to very quickly differentiate from other recruitment companies and ‘headhunters’. Within a few moments, it’s plainly obvious to the person I’m speaking with, but initially, I’ve been placed in the same annoying unprofessional, unethical, disingenuous category of the other recruiters. Sometimes the responses are quite rude. It didn’t occur to me that these unknowns are being approached by lots of companies all the time, being bombarded with opportunities (most of which are the same job being marketed by every recruiter on the planet) and hassled to the point of frustration beyond belief. Thankfully, I quickly demonstrate why I’m different and in the true sense of the word ‘Headhunter’, explain the key differences, not only in my ability as a Headhunter, but also my background, reputation and model of working which is unique to housebuilding. Let me explain the differences to those whom are unfamiliar with terms such as Contingency and Retained. I work on a retained basis for all assignments. This means that I partner with my clients to find the best people as quickly as possible for any given role. I’m paid in advance, or should I say, part of my fee is paid in advance when I’m about to commence a search. I explore the market and carefully consider the best people to select and interview for my clients. The process is fairly straightforward. Once I have identified a potential candidate, I will arrange to meet, usually out of hours and near the candidate’s home location to make life easier for them. I spend between 2 and 3 hours meeting each candidate in the search and build lasting relationships, based upon ethical practice, knowledge and trust. Once I have a shortlist from all of my meetings, I discuss the shortlist with my client and present a maximum of three candidates, sometimes fewer, depending upon suitability. Because I work exclusively with all clients, you won’t hear about the same job from anyone else, plus my confidentiality is the best in the business. I help, advise, manage and mentor people for all sorts of roles and create a profile of who you are why you should or shouldn’t fit into a particular company. This is possible from a deep understanding of all clients and target companies. Target companies are not clients. They are companies I choose to keep as targets for approaching on behalf of my clients. Contingency recruitment is very different. To summarise; Some recruiters who work on a contingency basis, whether they have instructions from the employer or not, will do their best to attract anyone and everyone remotely suitable or in some cases, unsuitable, for a fee. They will pester, annoy, frustrate, send CV’s speculatively and (often without your knowledge) to an employer. Once they have you on the hook, they’ll start trying to back-fill your own job, but lining up people to take over when you leave. No wonder people are sick of recruiters. Read my other blog called Dirty Rotten Recruiters.      

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Simon Wilkins

Simon Wilkins

The Headhunter

simon@wilkins.today

07554 234 567